The bronze sculpture of Brenda Fassie outside the Bassline music Venue in Newtown, Johannesburg, is one of 40 memorial art works placed by the Sunday Times around the country to celebrate its th birthday, and to promote national identity. The sculpture, by artist Angus Taylor, is a metre, life-size statue that is an unusual pose of the top selling pop diva, known to her fans as Ma Brr. The artist was inspired by two art works in Havanna – Jose Soberon Villa’s bronzes of John Lennon on a park bench, and Ernest Hemingway propping up a bar. Fassie is perched on a barstool, her mic which was broken and repaired in in front of her. Next to her, however, is a vacant barstool, inviting passers-by to take a seat and ‘chat’ to her. The stool is a way to encourage people to interact with the sculpture. Embossed in bronze in tiny letters are a number of quotes by Fassie. If you take the time to stop and look for them.

Brenda Fassie, 39, South African Pop Star, Dies

Making Queer History has a vague title because it has a rather vague purpose. What defines us is our focus not only on the past, but toward the future. I like to create controversy.

Brenda Fassie, SA’s music diva, passed away after suffering from a severe asthma attack. This was her life.

By Lumka Oliphant Oct 21, The South African music industry is about to shake – and who better to do it than the diva and queen of pop, the late Brenda Fassie? Fassie, better known as Mabrrr, is proving even from her grave to be ibhoza the boss of the industry, as she claimed, and this time – through the executor of her estate, David Feldman – she is taking her former manager and producer, Sello “Chicco” Twala, EMI Music and EMI Publishing to court over claims of years’ worth of unpaid royalties.

The Southern African Music Rights Organisation Samro , which is supposed to collect broadcast royalties for its members, will also have to prove its innocence. Samro has been ordered to hand over all files and records relating to the estate’s right to royalties, to the South African Recording Rights Association Limited Sarral. Fassie, albeit posthumously, is the first artist in this country to take the giants of the music industry to court and arguably, the second in the world after George Michael, who took Sony Music to court for rendering him a “pop slave”.

The court action is likely to have far-reaching effects for the local music industry, in which musicians have traditionally been at the mercy of record companies. Regarding Twala, Feldman wants him to account for monies received on behalf of the artist while he was her manager. In papers before court, Twala allegedly received payments of royalties and other monies for Fassie.

Twala confirmed he received the summons but said he found the executor’s move “funny that they are after me and not after Peter Snyman, who managed Brenda before she died. I have nothing to hide”. According to account records from Samro, there were periods that the singer received nothing for the Radio and General payment category. For 11 years, between and , Samro allegedly managed to pay the artist actual royalties on only three occasions.

Over the same year period she was credited with 5c for the material use of her works in films.

I don’t want a Brenda Fassie for a wife

Magazine article New African. Her death was widely anticipated days before she departed. Local newspapers screamed headlines like “Too late for Mama”, one of her popular songs. But when she finally died, it still came as a huge shock. South Africa had lost a beloved daughter who was very much a colourful part of its history and landscape.

I don’t want a Brenda Fassie for a wife. Date: January 1, SHARE: The story is about an older man complaining about the behaviour of his young wife.

We and our partners use cookies to personalize your experience, to show you ads based on your interests, and for measurement and analytics purposes. By using our website and our services, you agree to our use of cookies as described in our Cookie Policy. Known as the “Queen of the Vocals” and dubbed the “Madonna of the Townships” by Time Magazine, Brenda Fassie was one of South Africa’s most popular vocalists, mixing African vocals with a slick international pop sound.

She had her greatest success in the s and continued to record into the ensuing decades, but became a celebrity known more for her off-stage antics than her on-stage work. Born in in the small village of Langa, Cape Town, Fassie came from a musical family and began singing early, forming her first singing group at the age of four. Her precocious talent brought her to the attention of talent scouts from Johannesburg, one of whom eventually took the young teenager to the city to kick-start her career.

Then things started to unravel for Fassie. She was involved in several highly publicized affairs with both men and women and had also begun a costly and destructive cocaine addiction. It also didn’t help matters that she became notorious for missing concert dates. The nadir of her excess came in when Fassie was found in a drugged haze next to the dead body of her girlfriend.

Brenda Fassie Memorial

IT was party time for the Sunday Times yet again this week, this time a bash with an historical edge – but joyous as well. One of our th birthday undertakings is the Heritage Project in which prominent South Africans and local events we have covered as stories over the years, and which are part of our country’s history, will be honoured with artworks erected in appropriate places. On Thursday, a perfect late-summer evening, a very mixed crowd – showbiz, politicos, artists and media – met at the Bassline, situated among the manicured lawns yes, really and neat brick paving of Newtown, Joburg, to watch the unveiling of the first of the memorials.

Guest of honour was Bongani Fassie, the singer’s year-old son who has his mum’s slight frame. He sang a song called I Miss You that he’d written specially for her. This seemed to consist mostly of the words “If I hurt you, I’m sorry”.

Brenda Fassie, Category: Artist, Albums: Now Is The Time, Angiph’Endlini, Amadlozi, Paparazzi, I Am Not A Bad Girl, Singles: Ag Shame Lovey, Mama, Top​.

Award-winning recording artist and engineer by profession Satlam, real name Lamek Shatilwe has been making waves in the entertainment industry lately, but not for his music this time around, but for his comedy skills. TOADS, roads, and reloads as yet the end of another pandemic week beckons. Thursday, Friday’s eternal sidekick, giving us that weekend wink of anticipation… as if Covid gives a hoot about what we want to and don’t want to do….

THE Ministry of Mines and Energy has announced fuel prices will increase for September by 30 cents on petrol and 15 cents on diesel. MAERUA Mall owners Oryx Properties Limited announced this week they will now pay the full 69,75 cents interim distribution — all thanks to a delay in the release of financial statements. Preliminary post mortem results show the singer died of a drug overdose, but Peter Snyman, Fassie’s manager, said he had evidence of the drugs having been tampered with.

Snyman and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a friend of Fassie, are to ask the police to question a young woman who visited her at her home in Sandton on April That was the last occasion Fassie used crack cocaine. The next morning Fassie had an asthma attack and was rushed to the Sunninghill Clinic in Johannesburg. She lapsed into a coma from which she never recovered, and died on May 9 after her life support machines were turned off. A drug dealer visited Fassie – who was in drug rehabilitation clinics 30 times – while she was in hospital, the newspaper said.

Snyman said a young man, now in a coma in a Johannesburg hospital, had also bought drugs from the dealer who supplied Fassie. Drug dealers are known to add harmful substances to their merchandise to increase their bulk, and the dealers’ profit.

WATCH: Brenda Fassie tells son to “look after mommy” in sombre video

Click here to listen to the full What’s Gone Viral with Khabazela. We’re listening! Tell us what you think about Microsoft News here. Queen Elizabeth’s socially distant gatherine. Scorpio: Your well being horoscope – August Belarus deports several foreign journalists covering protests.

A video of the late Brenda Fassie speaking to her son, Bongani has just surfaced and the nostalgia this has triggered is uncontainable.

Ms Fassie, 39, dubbed the “Madonna of the Townships”, emerged from a Cape Town slum in the early s to become one of the pillars of the anti-apartheid struggle as she gave a voice to marginalised and disenfranchised blacks. She was admitted to Johannesburg’s Sunninghill Hospital after an asthma attack on April 26 led to cardio-respiratory arrest. She slipped into a coma and died Sunday. Thousands of well-wishers, including Mr Mbeki, former President Nelson Mandela, his wife Graca and ex-wife Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, and many others had visited the pop icon in hospital.

The outspoken Ms Fassie shot to fame at the height of the anti-apartheid struggle in the s, winning legions of fans in poverty-stricken townships in South Africa and across Africa, through her songs whose main themes were rooted in ghetto life, love and pain. She sang about the destruction of black aspirations under apartheid in songs like “Black President” which inspired youths to revolt against the old order.

But as her fame grew, Ms Fassie started leaving a controversial life.

[WATCH] Video of SA music icon Brenda Fassie showcases late singer’s talent

We are constantly updating this page with new financial and earning details. Later on in life she was briefly married to Nhlanhla Mbambo. Brenda Fassie Net Worth. It is not clear whether she was Xhosa, but she was a proud South African.

Bongani can enjoy a good life after a court settled his mother’s estate 14 years after her death. Brenda died of a cocaine overdose and left her.

Known as the “Queen of the Vocals” and dubbed the “Madonna of the Townships” by Time Magazine, Brenda Fassie was one of South Africa’s most popular vocalists, mixing African vocals with a slick international pop sound. She had her greatest success in the s and continued to record into the ensuing decades, but became a celebrity known more for her off-stage antics than her on-stage work. Born in in the small village of Langa, Cape Town, Fassie came from a musical family and began singing early, forming her first singing group at the age of four.

Her precocious talent brought her to the attention of talent scouts from Johannesburg, one of whom eventually took the young teenager to the city to kick-start her career. Then things started to unravel for Fassie. She was involved in several highly publicized affairs with both men and women and had also begun a costly and destructive cocaine addiction. It also didn’t help matters that she became notorious for missing concert dates. The nadir of her excess came in when Fassie was found in a drugged haze next to the dead body of her girlfriend.

The horror of the event was enough to shock her out of her spiraling decline. Her next album, Memeza , was released in and was the most focused and accomplished album she had released in nearly a decade.

Watch this documentary to remember Brenda Fassie, 15 years after her death

This was one year before her celebrated comeback with her album Memeza, which became the biggest-selling album in the country. Her fans and dear friends included Nelson Mandela and Thabo Mbeki, and when she was hospitalised in , they were among the high-profile visitors to her sick bed. Her achievements and her influence are especially admirable considering that she was born the youngest of nine children in the township of Langa in the Western Cape.

Watch all of it now.

Who Is Bongani Fassie Dating. Relationship the to return not to only daughter their with him left mama baby his after father single a now is Fassie Brenda late the.

Category: Radio 2 ; Africa. Date: Dubbed the ‘Madonna of the Townships’, Fassie’s story melds a remarkable public success story with a catastrophic private life. As a teenager she was spotted by music producer Koloi Langa and she was soon on her way to Johannesburg to begin her professional career. Brenda and the Big Dudes shot to fame in the Eighties with the bubble-gum hit Weekend Special, which became the fastest selling record of the time.

Fassie’s highs included record sales and an array of music accolades, including four consecutive South African Music Awards. A failed marriage, drug abuse, non-appearances at concerts and debt culminated in her nadir when she woke in a drug-induced state next to the dead body of her lesbian lover, Poppie Sihlahla, who had died of an apparent drug overdose. A miserable period followed, including a spell in a drug rehabilitation centre.

But in Fassie reunited with Twala to record Memeza Shout which she later described as the album that epitomised her life. It was a new start that confounded her critics: Memeza was South Africa’s best selling album of and, in the same year, Fassie scooped the Kora Award for best female artist. A string of best-selling albums and awards followed. Now at her career zenith Fassie said: “Tell them Brenda’s back!

593: V Entertainment – Bongani Fassie drops a beat